Cartoon: Exceeding the Speed Limit (1922)

This cartoon, from December 1922, highlights a number of topical issues relating to film projection and good presentation. In the cartoon the projectionist can be seen running a film at a speed far greater than that intended. Before the arrival of sound, which required precise projection speeds, the playback speed of a projector was not standardised. The audience members shielding their eyes relates to debates that were taking place at the time about the effect of projection speeds on people's eyes, with some claiming that projecting at faster speeds caused eye-strain.

The warden wearing the KRS helmet is a representative of the Kinematograph Renters' Society, the organisation responsible for distributing film prints. During this period there was significant discussion in the trade press regarding film damage and the poor standards of projection that resulted. High speed projection was just one potential cause of film damage, but here we see the literalisation and personification of the hypothetical 'bad projectionist' and the affected organisation, battling for good projection standards, with the audience as suffering bystanders.

Used with permission from Screen International

Breaking the Speed Limit (1922.12.21).jpg

Title

Cartoon: Exceeding the Speed Limit (1922)

Subject

presentation

Description

This cartoon, from December 1922, highlights a number of topical issues relating to film projection and good presentation. In the cartoon the projectionist can be seen running a film at a speed far greater than that intended. Before the arrival of sound, which required precise projection speeds, the playback speed of a projector was not standardised. The audience members shielding their eyes relates to debates that were taking place at the time about the effect of projection speeds on people's eyes, with some claiming that projecting at faster speeds caused eye-strain.

The warden wearing the KRS helmet is a representative of the Kinematograph Renters' Society, the organisation responsible for distributing film prints. During this period there was significant discussion in the trade press regarding film damage and the poor standards of projection that resulted. High speed projection was just one potential cause of film damage, but here we see the literalisation and personification of the hypothetical 'bad projectionist' and the affected organisation, battling for good projection standards, with the audience as suffering bystanders.

Used with permission from Screen International

Creator

Kinematograph Weekly

Source

Kinematograph Weekly, 21 December 1922, p. 34

Publisher

The University of Warwick

Date

01/11/2017

Contributor

Kinematograph Weekly

Rights

Published with permission

Format

.jpg

Language

English

Type

Image

Coverage

1920s

Citation

Kinematograph Weekly, “Cartoon: Exceeding the Speed Limit (1922),” Projection Project, accessed December 8, 2019, https://projectionproject.warwick.ac.uk/items/show/509.

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